AUTHORBernstein, B. J.
TITLESeizing the Contested Terrain of Early Nuclear History: Stimson, Conant, and Their Allies Explain the Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb
PERIODICAL TITLEDiplomatic History
DATE PUBLISHED1995
VOLUME NUMBERn/a
ISSUE NUMBERSpring
PAGE NUMBERS35-72
ISSN0145-2096


This article discusses two other articles written by members of the political elite which were influential in defending the use of atomic bombs to end World War II. Barton Bernstein argues that the authors of the two articles, U.S. Secretary of War Stimson and the President of Harvard University, James Conant, were driven by their personal motivations to maintain public support for the decision to use atomic weapons and to gain support for future nuclear policies, and, accordingly, argued in the two articles why using the bombs was the correct decision. Bernstein describes the events and processes surrounding the publication of the articles, and asserts that the articles were uncontested as accounts of history, when in fact, they were efforts at persuasion.


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