AUTHORShalom, Zaki
TITLEKennedy, Ben-Gurion, and the Dimona Project, 1962-1963
PERIODICAL TITLEISIS
DATE PUBLISHEDSpring 1996
VOLUME NUMBER1
ISSUE NUMBER1
PAGE NUMBERS3-33
ISSN0021-1753
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This article explores the shift in the U.S. President John. F. Kennedy administration policy toward Israel’s nuclear program from a policy of low-profile involvement to increasingly aggressive interference as Kennedy's concern over nuclear proliferation grew. Focusing on the years 1962 and 1963, the author looks at the problems raised by Israel's Dimona nuclear facility in the broad context of U.S.-Israel relations. The article discusses Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion’s relationship with Kennedy, Kennedy's demand for inspection of the Dimona facility, and the concerns that motivated Ben-Gurion to remain on friendly terms with the United States. The change in U.S.-Israel relations is argued to have been precipitated by four factors: Kennedy's popularity, Ben-Gurion's declining prestige, Israel's increased dependence on the U.S., and Ben-Gurion’s unease regarding growing Arab unity.


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