AUTHORWalker, Mark
TITLENational Socialism and German Physics
PERIODICAL TITLEJournal of Contemporary History
DATE PUBLISHED1989
VOLUME NUMBER24
ISSUE NUMBER1 (January)
PAGE NUMBERS63-89
ISSN0022-0094


This article describes conflict between politics and science during the Third Reich in Germany from 1933 through World War II. Starting with the rise of Hitler, some German physicists formed a group that advanced a view called deutsche Physik, which renounced the importance of scientific discoveries by non-Aryans such as Albert Einstein. In concert with the National Socialist Party, the members caused trouble for other physicists, including Werner Heisenberg, who refused to subscribe to their anti-Semitic views. Heisenberg and others were denied academic positions. The author shows that as World War II proceeded, the government and Nazi party leaders became more concerned with scientific advances and military armaments than with the influence of Jews on physics.


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