AUTHORDower, John W.
TITLEHiroshima, Nagasaki, and the Politics of Memory
PERIODICAL TITLETechnology Review
DATE PUBLISHED1995
VOLUME NUMBER98
ISSUE NUMBER6 (August/September)
PAGE NUMBERS48-51
ISSN1099-274X


This article by a respected historian examines how both the United States and Japan are still grappling half a century later with the legacy left by the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The article highlights the widespread objections that arose over a planned exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution on the decision to use the atomic bomb that featured the Enola Gay. The author asserts that even today many Americans continue to view the atomic bombings in the heroic light they were painted in by the U.S. government at the end of World War II. Moving to the Japanese perspective, the author describes a tendency of Japanese people to downplay their country’s involvement in World War II and view themselves as victims of an American nuclear assault. He concludes that people in both countries would do well to revisit and honestly reflect upon the events that shaped the course of the 20th century.


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